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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
courage and enormous strength, as well as, he challenged us all to not just acknowledge the science of climate change, to understand that it is real and happening, but to also charge the cabinet to take immediate action. call me biased, but i believe it was his best speeches so far, although he is not done yet, i'm quite sure. he walked through his climate action plan as well, which outlined some common sense, pragmatic steps that the epa and other agencies across the administration are now taking to cut carbon pollution, invest in clean energy, to help our cities and towns build in more resilient ways so that they can add depth to a changing climate and keep our communities safe, but also to prepare to be a broader and more vocal leader on the issue of climate change in international discussions. as you know, in september, epa proposed urban pollution standards for new power plants using our authority that congress gave us under the clean air act. those power plant labor relations regulations are proposals that would impact new facilities being constructed. this would ensure any ne
are now on the lower end of the curve. below average in math and science. this is a competitive crisis for american business. why are we not succeeding here? what's being done to fix it? two leading people on the american education charge. first, though, to sue at the nyse. >> thank you very much. a rough day for the dow jones industrial average. we are off of our lows but still up 21% this year. right now the dow jones industrial average down 104 points. transports have been on a huge tear, down today, but up 35% year to date. the s&p also in the red today. it's up 25% this year. it's down just 7.3 points today. similar story at the nasdaq, up 27% year to date. let's bring in bp and kenny polcari, director o'neill's security and cnbc market analyst. we've been talking about the pivot point in the market, the turn in the market when it would come. is this what we're seeing today? >> i think it feels like. the only thing you have to be careful of, not a the lo of volume. we've only done 300 million shares which tells you the big the boys are sitting out and waiting. does feel like it wa
sometimes ask me, like, how would you write science fiction about the future? how do you predict things about the future. in general, if you want to predict futuristic things that feel credible, i think what you should do is imagine that anything that today requires a big group like a corporation or government or army and imagine it being done by a group of people who are about knit together as a bake sale. i think that feels futuristic. we have built things as complicated as skyscrapers using these open methodologies and that trend will continue so what would an optimistically conceived space program that was made out of mail lists and wiki's look like? that to me is the optimistic future. >> i'm glad there is one. >> questions? >> i'm not in charge of hands so don't look at me when you -- there's mic runners over there. >> i thought you were a local of san francisco when you wrote this. what research did you do about san francisco to get the knowledge? >> i lived here for six years before moving overseas so that was my research. i commuted here for years. i used to work for a high-t
reaching out to the next generation of scientists, here is a good example at the lawrence science berkeley, they are creating what they call an apollo moment for the next generation. there is also a documentary called back to the moon for good. showing the progress the teams made so far in order to get back to the moon in 2015. the document runs through the holidays. of course, that is a very cool exhibit. and brody brazil joins us. >> this story is almost impossible to tackle by itself, that is why we're here to digest and tackle it. it is a possible move back wards. we'll tell us what happened in the last 24 hours that might have been held from us, the public for the last six months. >>> and one of the best rivalries in the nfl kicks off. the 49ers to host the seahawks with lots of implications on the line tomorrow. plus, it could be the second to last game ever at the stick. a full preview coming up next. >>> well, the seahawks have already secured a spot in the nfl playoffs, but if they win at candle stick, they will also clinch the afc west. and they have a lot to play for as they try
and stuff. >> kate larson, nbc bay area news. >> and coming up next, creating science projects out of scrap. we'll show you. >> it's so cool. and so weird and whacky and different. that looking at them just, you know, gets you excited. wow, what is that thing? >> i like weird, whacky and different. how a bay area teacher developed a nonprofit that helps thousands of classrooms. i love watching tv outside. and why can you move the tv out here? the wireless receiver. i got that when i switched to u-verse. but why? because it's so much better than cable. it's got more hd channels, more dvr space. yeah, but i mean, how did you know? i researched. no, i-i told you. no. yeah! no. the important part is that you're happy now. and i got you this visor. you made a visor! yes! that i'll never wear. ohh. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for two years with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. ♪ pose! yeah! ♪ flash! yeah! ♪ get the family to strike a pose, ♪ ♪ and show off your brand new clothes! ♪ ♪ that's my kind of holiday. >> thanks largely to one woman, teachers
of those units. >> i think this is political theatre. >> uc berkeley political science professor steven weber says it really doesn't matter why they detained him. what matters is that he's now in north korea's custody. although no one is going to say out loud that's what it is, both sides know exactly that's what it is. >> how this will play out weber says is uncertain pop i do think there's some fatigue in washington, d.c. at providing concessions to the north koreans every time they kind of create some trouble, we give them something. >> kimberly, thank you. >> vice president joe biden has a week-long trip planned to asia this week, including a stop in south korea. this is video of him in panama two weeks ago. he plans to participate in a ceremony honoring u.s. troops who died during the korean war. there's no word at this point if he plans to discuss with anyone the arrest of merrill newman. there's a statement that asks for the release of merrill newman as well as kenneth bay, another american held in the communist country. we are following the story at nbc bay area.com. type in det
, the legislation does not go far enough. >> a few years ago these undetectible plastic guns were science fiction. they were the stuff of movies. now they're frighteningly real. it will be unimaginable for congress not to pass a strong law that closes the loopholes and bans these guns once and for all. >> the nra did not oppose the extension of the plastic gun ban but does oppose any expansion of it. >>> now to business. later this morning the adp's employment report will be out. in terms of stocks yesterday, all three major indices in negative territory. almost 100 points in the dow which is back below 16,000. it's the longest losing streak in two months. joining us now this is a treat, kayla. >> you have to say that. >> it is a treat when anyone from state side comes on our show. >> thank you, brian. well, our eyes turn again to washington because regulators are set to vote on a key portion of the dod-frank regulation next tuesday, december 10th. it's expected to be approved. the passing of the rule will mark an era of stricter oversight for wall street with a lot of restrictions on how banks c
combined the latest breakthroughs in science straight from leading research centers with wisdom from the ages. >> knowing what you're really hungry for is the key to losing weight, enjoying more vitality and feeling more joy. >> announcer: join dr. deepak chopra and learn how to permanently lose weight, gain emotional well-being, and reduce the risks of dreaded
for courts to overturn convictions based on science that is later debunked so on november 18th the san antonio four reunited and meeting the granddaughter for the first time and ready to makeup for lost time. >> it was a death in the family and births. marriages and just so many things over the years that we have missed. >> reporter: the road aheld won't be easy, the women have been released but not exonerated and there is that to fight, jobs to find and lives to rebuild. the four say as long as they stick together they will do all that and more. heidi docastra al jazeera san antonio. >> more than 2000 people who were wrongfully convicted have been exonerated in the past two decades and spent an average of ten years in prison and 30% of them have been exonerated by dna evidence. the president obama and first ladder were there and billy joel and santana and oprah singer, jazz musician herbie joncock and these are performers who influenced culture through the arts. and the flash mob military style, the u.s. airforce ban surprised visitors at the washington and space museum and it starte
places, less generally. there's no science to it. one of the things that was irresponsibly sold was the idea that a certain idea of stops and frisks would make the city safer. if you double it the city would be twice as safe. it was bizarre and shouldn't have been put out there. >> you mentioned the counterterrorism. some argue it's very successful since there's not been a major terrorist attack. what is it that needs to happen in that unit. i think it needs to scale back the activities. the unit targeted the communities, not based on a suspicion of wrongdoing. people were muslim. they went to the mosque, they went to a halal butcher shop. these are the things used to target communities. we need to go back it a place where people civil people when there was a reason to do so. they don't go around collecting everything from the halal food restaurants. >> be more focused on it. ooep if it leads to know terrorist attack. >> you are assuming there's a causation between the wide net. >> last year the uniform chief of the intelligence division said that they had not had a single in th
will do more of it in some places, a lot less of it generally but there is no science to it. one things that got irresponsibly sold is that a certain amount of stops and frifshingz would make the city safer and if you doubled that, the city would somehow be twice as safe. that was bizarre and should never have been put out there. >> you mentioned the counter terrorism formed after september 11th. some arguments, it's very successful especially since there has not been a major terror attack in new york city since then. what needs to happen with that unit? >> that unit needs to significantly scale back its activities. the unit has targeted entire communities, not based upon any suspicion of wrongdoing but simply because people were muslim, because they went to the mosque, because they prayed >> because they went to a halal butcher shop. these are the kind of things that have been used to target entire communities. we need to go back to a place where the police surveilled people when they had a reason to do so and don't just go around klegging those who go to the halal restaurants. >> if h
go. you know, from a young age. i definitely want to major in political science. become the mayor or something. make the situation better for other people. my name is justin, and i am your dividend. tonight. more than 141 million americans went shopping this thanksgiving holiday weekend. that's up two million from last year. americans spent about 57.4 billion over the four-day weekend. while sales were down slightly on black friday, thanksgiving sales helped increase the two-day total by 2.3%. no sooner shoppers shoppers fih devouring bargains in the stores and now millions will go on-line to get more sweet deals. it is called cyber monday. this year experts say it could break records. shoppers are expected to spend nearly $2 billion on-line tomorrow. but as michael finney reports, the event has stretched to nearly a week of digital door busters. >> some folks love the chaos. the thrill of the hunt and the festive atmosphere of black friday shopping. others, not so much. >> i don't go out on black friday. i do it on-line. >> cyber monday, that is fantastic. you don't have to worr
york. the group says that based on law science and history tommy has all the rights of habeas corpus and therefore deserves to be brought before a judge and released. tommy is owned by a couple in the small town of glovrsville so farther not commenting. monkey see monkey sue. >> another half hour of 7 news at 9:00 moments away. >> really close with my frep. i'm devastated. comes in wave waves. >> actor paul walker father talks about his son impact on others. as investigators look into the fiery crash that killed the actor and his frien friend. >> also niners qb kaepernick muscle his way that the hearts of kids at ronald mcdonald house. that's our reporter sharing a moment with him. she has the story. >> america epidemic of twins [ man ] it's big. supports in times of need. same with aladdin. the biggest in bail. no one has lower prices, is faster or more professional. aladdin bail bonds. bigger because we're better. aladdin bail bonds. to thsuffered in silence... hoped... and lived in a state of fear... welcome to a new state... of health. welcome to covered california. the pla
that his death was caused by polonium-210. french science tests found polonium found in the natural origin and did not cause the death. his widow reacts to conflicting reports. >> you can imagine to what extent i'm upset by these contradictions regarding the best european experts on the matt. what should one think. >> reporter: an document first reported that swiss scientists found high levels of polonium in blood and urine samples. arafat's widow, a french citizen, asked for a an inquiry eight years after his death. 60 tissue samples were collected and distributed to france, switzerland and russia. swiss scientists concluded that he was poisoned. >> they are characteristic of him having a dose of polonium just before he died. so those levels are about 36 times what you would expect in a normal person. >> reporter: according to palestinian officials russian scientists reported the amount of polonium in arafat's samples were inconclusive. france reports it could have come from naturally occurring gasses surrounding the too many. >> french officials say they'll continue their investigation.
years, american 15-year-olds have fallen further behind in math, science and reading. it's dubious for a country that spends more on education than anything else. it's a key test given to 15-year-olds in 65 countries. the u.s. ranks 36th in math. east asian countries top all three categories in science, the u.s. ranks 28th. only in reading are u.s. students really above average and still pretty much in the middle of the pack. shanghai takes every spot but they hardly represent all of china. it's a slim, slim look about the education system in china. the u.s. slipped in the rankings since 2009. scores are a little changed from the first report in 2000. what's wrong here? the report blames weak u.s. curriculum and education secretary arne duncan calls it a picture of educational stagnation. this is a reality at odds with aspirations to have the best educated work force in the world. he's pushing new common core standards in 45 states. a nationwide drive to standardize education hoping to stem the slide and reenergize american students. brooke? >> we roll on. i'm brooke baldwin here i
are down four spots in science coming in at 24. and they slipped another -- >> this is unbelievable. >> ten spots -- >> look at that. >> to 21st when it comes to reading. several chinese cities as well as japan and singapore saw their students improve significantly. >> willie geist, your mom has been involved in educational reform. we were talking about mike bloomberg who dedicated four years to it. the gates spent billions and billions of dollars and the only thing -- not the only thing but one of the main things they learned reducing class sides. they spent billions of dollars on that. that doesn't work. man, the past four years when it seems everybody's focus has turned to education reform in a big way, just been disastrous, not disastrous but terrible. our state of the union are getting worse and worse. >> this is a trajectory we've seen for more than a decade. it goes back. maybe you say we'll give the reforms of the last few years to settle in. reaction to this study was amazing. you have all these special interest groups saying it's not our fault. it's not the fact that we're teachin
of urgency to get a deal or to meet any dead lien when it comes to a budget. the house science committee is out of this world. >> a full house committee will spend time today holding a hearing on aliens. >> do you think it's even conceivable that there is not other life somewhere in the universe? >> today's hearing appears to be a serious effort to educate congress. >> do you believe there's life out there, dr. dick? >> yes, i do. >> okay. dr. seger? >> yes. >> and today's top trender. bill backtracks. >> words matter. >> even if it takes a change in the law, the president should honor the commitment the federal government made to those people and let them keep what they got. >> president clinton, i think, went off the rails and defended the junk insurance industry. >> clinton says he was only trying to help by defending junk insurance. >> i was trying to be supportive of it. i said nothing about this until the president himself spoke. i don't think you can find anybody in america who has worked harder for his re-election or supported this bill or went out of his way to explain the bill
couldn't prove their technology was supported by science. so now the company has decided to continue selling the kits but says results will now be limited to ancestry-related information and raw uninterpreted genetic data. >>> i can interpret the weather outside. it is really cold. >> you're hired. >> it's cold inside and it's freezing outside. >> it really is. literally. getting close to the freezing mark. get this. parts of california with snow as low as 600 feet. we've got pictures. we're going to show that to you coming up and let you know how low it could go across the south bay tomorrow morning. >>> in two months he's going to take over one of the most ill lu lustriosu jobs on television. it's a high-stakes move for an entertainer who has bay area ties. tonight, raj mathai has "the interview" are jimmy. >> reporter: in two months he'll take over one of the most illustrious jobs in the history of television. jimmy fallon will replace jay leno on the "tonight show." it's a high-stakes move for an entertainer with bay area ties. tonight "the interview" with jimmy fallon. >> from s
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. yep. got all the cozies. [ grandma ] with new fedex one rate, i could fill a box and ship it for one flat rate. so i knit until it was full. you'd be crazy not to. is that nana? [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. simple, flat rate shipping with the reliability of fedex. [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. but with less energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive,y first. i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron. the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about 2 weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women especially those who are or who may become pregnant and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increas
going into the vehicle. i know this looks like science fiction. it's not. >> rose: wow! >> bezos: this is early. this is still years away. it drops the package. >> rose: and there's the package. >> bezos: you come and get your package. and we can do half-hour delivery. >> rose: half-hour delivery? >> bezos: half-hour delivery, and we can carry objects, we think, up to five pounds, which covers 86% of the items that we deliver. >> rose: and what is the range between the fulfillment center and where you can do this within 30 minutes. >> bezos: these generations of vehicles, it could be a ten-mile radius from a fulfillment center. so, in urban areas, you could actually cover very significant portions of the population. and so, it won't work for everything; you know, we're not going to deliver kayaks or table saws this way. these are electric motors, so this is all electric. it's very green, it's better than driving trucks around. this is all an r&d project. >> rose: with drones, there's somebody sitting somewhere in front of a screen. >> bezos: not these; these are autonomous. so yo
behind their peers in other countries. the u.s. is now ranked 31st in math 24th in science, and 21st in reading. the assessment is based on a worldwide test taken last year by 6,000 american 15-year-olds. the test results show no improvement by u.s. students over the past decade. >>> time to show you some of this morning's headlines. "the wall street journal" says the number of banks in the united states are at their lowest level since the great depression. federally insured banks shrank to about 6900 in the third quarter, from a high of about 18,000. many smaller banks merged or simply collapsed. but overall bank deposits and assets are growing. >>> the "detroit free press" says a judge rules this morning on whether to allow the city's bankruptcy to proceed. about $18 billion in debt and liabilities must be dealt with. >> "the new york times" looks at soaring hospital charges. a day spent as an inpatient at an american hospital costs an average of more than $4,000. that is five times the cost in many other modern countries. a single stitch can cost $500. >> the
provided by: [[ m maalele a annnonoununcece, meet selsun science. you're history. seselslsunun b blulue e itch. ggetets s toto t the root off and hydrates the scalp. seselslsunun b blulue itchy . >>> there's a video that was shot back in october of 2011 that is just now going viral . >>> a video that was shot and just know going viral and it is a gem. >> and this is jason mraz, and the beautiful lady there with him is alexandra jaret. >> he is playing one of his popular songs lucky. she is singing the song lucky with him and this all happened in los angeles. > >> alexandra had gone to see jason mrazperform and she was turned away because she was underage and will skewed to wait in the alley way and i hope he comes out and even better than just coming out and saying hello. ended up singing this entire song. and she is incompetence zanily talented. listen to the pipes on this girl. >> >> they sound amazing together. >> r mber i said this video just started going viral. people do have the story behind this particular . >>> remember, i said it started going viral and everyone is saying. when
and they're being used to do science surveys. >> these are not places that have skyscrapers and a lot of -- in theory, there's not a lot of other aerospace clutter, if you will. that's a big deal. it would never work in manhattan, for example. >> well, i guess i would never say never. the truth is technologically speaking they could fly one of these things from downtown to midtown to your offices here today. >> look at cars. they can tell you when to stop, how fast, when to move. >> that's true, never say never. >> the technology greatly exceeds their ability. >> how about flying in inclimate weather? could the flying ha batibachi, wasn wanted to take off -- >> i raise you one. thieves. there's a $40,000 drone. i'll shoot it out of the sky. >> they're doing research right now to use drones to carry explosives for avalanche control in the mountains. >> that would be fascinating. >> when it's so foggy or the weather is so bad you can't send people out for avalanches for highways, for instance -- >> genius. >> you could program it to travel up at noon and drop an explosive for avalanche
. this is a science which is why i use the boxing terminology. if you're at home and you know, boxing is known as the sweet science. they could have posted this at 12 noon instead of 6:00 a.m. and gotten dramatically more people seeing it. >> a store owner in new jersey thinks they've done it, they need to do so much more. you have another example, holiday inn. what's this retweet that they did? >> this is my favorite thing to hate on. there are way too many businesses retweeting nice things being said about them. let me make this point once and for all. if you retweet something that's being said about you that's awesome, you are bragging. >> you also have a tip, avoid one-way conversations. again, sort of the bull horn effect. what do you mean by this? >> again, it's that blasting out. i mean, social media is about listening as well. it's customer service. i wrote this book to build a manual for all of the people who have small businesses, a lot of people who have young entrepreneurs budding. entrepreneurship is exploding. i wanted to tactically show them how to do it. if you're talking about
planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. if every u.s. home replaced one light bulb with a compact fluorescent bulb, the energy saved could light how many homes? 1 million? 2 million? 3 million? the answer is... 3 million homes. by 2030, investments in energy efficiency could help americans save $300 billion each year. take the energy quiz. energy lives here. >>> up next, the surprising admission to the engineer at the controls of sunday's deadly train crash up next on "morning joe." this is the quicksilver cash back card from capital one. it's not the "fumbling around with rotating categories" card. it's not the "getting blindsided by limits" card. it's the no-game-playing, no-earning-limit-having, deep-bomb-throwing, give-me-the-ball-and-i'll-take- it-to-the-house, cash back card. this is the quicksilver cash card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere, every single day. so let me ask you... what's in your wallet? medicare open enrollment. of year again. s
do to a security wise. we have to look at this is a very real threat no matter how science fiction does to think about that happening. it could easily happen and it's our job to stop it. >> colon the gene tweets in represented hunter iran has not invaded another country for more than 200 years. they have a right to defend themselves. what do you say to that argument? >> guest: iran has invaded other countries through proxy terrorists. they are in a whole lot of places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan so they haven't invaded because that is not with these countries do. with these countries do is end when i say countries i'm in countries like afghanistan prewar and iran have proxy wars and a fund to promote and train bad actors in their state bad bad actors in their state and send them out to other countries to destabilize those countries and kill and maim people. husk of the front page of "the new york times" and don't know if you saw this story. groups gain in turmoil across the mideast. violence has presented new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to
the first person to jump from this half-mile high waterfall. then science meets art in an event that would impress mother nature. meet the mysterious man who works in the clouds. and it's the toughest obstacle course on the planet, a muddy 24-hour test of the human spirit. ♪ music ♪ ♪ music ♪
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)